Golden Pathos the perfect indoor plant for beginners

The living wall at Sarnia Christian School is fully of healthy Golden Pothos tropical plants. Gardening expert John DeGroot writes that Golden Pathos requires little attention. John DeGroot photo

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Hands down, the easiest houseplant to grow is Golden Pothos. It won’t win any beauty contest awards, but its lush foliage will brighten the gloomiest of rooms.

Golden Pothos (Epipremnum Aureum) is virtually indestructible. It will survive in low light conditions and requires water only as often as you might remember to give it. It is for these reasons that Golden Pothos is also a favourite for commercial and office environments.

Ideally grown in a hanging pot, Golden Pothos is often planted in a small pot and placed on top of a filing cabinet where its trailing ivy-type stems will grow downward. Office environments are fine for Golden Pothos where fluorescent lighting takes the place of natural sunshine.

As for soil, any soilless growing medium will do the trick. If you are likely to forget to water the Pothos, mixing heavier potting soil with the soilless medium will increase the moisture holding capacity. There is no need to plant it in a decorative pot because the trailing vines will cover and hide the container.

Golden Pothos will grow in remarkably low light conditions. If placed in a dark corner, the golden streaks in the foliage will diminish somewhat. If you keep your Golden Pothos in a west window where it will get a lot of direct light it will need more water. A well-lit room away from the direct sun is ideal.

Watering every week or two will keep Golden Pothos very happy. If you forget to water Golden Pothos for more than a few weeks, its leaves will go limp but will recover as soon as water is added. If Golden Pothos is waterlogged for a spell, that won’t be a problem either. I have seen office settings where the soil of Pothos was saturated in coffee and without issues. For optimum performance, water once or twice a week, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. Your container should have holes in the bottom and excess water that goes into the saucer should be disposed of.

Once you’ve enjoyed your Golden Pothos for more than about six months, you will find that its trailing vines will begin to grow long and leggy. Pruning back the limbs once or twice a year will keep the plant healthy, dense and compact.

Golden Pothos is rarely bothered by pests or disease. Overwatering for an extended period of time may cause root rot. If planted among other tropical plants that are more susceptible, mealybug may find their home on Golden Pothos.

Golden Pothos is the perfect plant for those who may be timid about growing tropical plants. Once the Pothos has been growing for a while, it will be easy to venture into more indoor plant varieties.

 

 

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