Tropical Depression Erin to bypass eastern US, strike Canada

While minimal impacts will occur along the U.S. East coast from Erin, the same cannot be promised for parts of southeastern Canada by the end of the week

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The tropical feature AccuWeather meteorologists were tracking for several days across the southeastern United States became Tropical Depression Six across the open waters of the western Atlantic Ocean on Monday.

Further strengthening to Tropical Storm Erin occurred Tuesday evening before losing wind strength and becoming a tropical depression again Wednesday morning.

A general north to northeastward track will keep Erin and its rainfall away from most of the Eastern Seaboard through midweek.

However, rough surf and rip currents will batter coastal communities from the Outer Banks of North Carolina to New England and Atlantic Canada.

“Minor coastal flooding and/or beach erosion can occur as well,” AccuWeather Meteorologist Ryan Adamson said.

Cruise and shipping interests along the East coast will want to monitor the path of Erin and consider finding an alternate route, if able.

A non-tropical storm system pushing across the Northeast on Wednesday will aid in Erin not making a direct landfall to the United States.

“However, rain from the tropical system could be drawn northward and into the non-tropical storm across part of New England,” according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski. “There may be a brief period of gusty winds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts and the nearby islands that is related to the tropical system.”

The tropical depression is forecast to approach the Maritime Provinces of Canada, as well as Newfoundland during Thursday and Friday.

Rainfall amounts can average 0.50 to 1.50 inches (12-38 mm) from Nova Scotia to Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland, with locally higher amounts. In addition to rain, wind gusts can approach 50 mph (80 km/h), especially along coastal locations and in the higher elevations.

The combination of rain and wind can lead to minor delays on the road and in the air from Halifax, Nova Scotia, to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and Stephenville, Newfoundland.

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